Starting last week, I began staying a little closer to work during the weeknights. I am renting a room for these 5 nights and the days following until I go back home on the weekends. I am doing this for several reasons:

  1. It’s expensive to live here. Everytime I drive my car to and from work, it’s costing me around $.50 a mile. I think the government reimburses you about $.40 a mile but I would imagine that driving in LA is more like $.50 or $.60 a mile. So, every little that I don’t have to drive is like a financial break. Gas prices are as high as almost $3 for a gallon (although, I just filled up for $2.65 yesterday at my favorite location). And then getting work done on my car could cost me hundreds of dollars. Delaying the inevitable is important for my personal finances and lifecycle of my car. The longer I can make this car last, the better it will be for me in the long run. So, instead of driving to work everyday, I will now be driving down once to my new place, parking for the week, and driving back home on Friday.
  2. I save a lot of time from being on the road. I woke up at 5am starting the 2nd week of work just to avoid traffic so that I could maximize the time I had for myself. Instead of being on the road for 2.25-3 hours a day, that cut it down to about 1.5-2.25 hours. Not a huge improvement, but enough to give me more minutes during my day to do more productive things.
  3. Doing both of these cuts down on the stress that I feel. I know that I will get stressed over these kinds of situations, but by doing what I’m doing, it helps my happiness level, which is always important for my productivity.

So, as I see it this is a good temporary situation to be in. However, let’s sorta break it down financially and see if this really is worth it.

Assuming that I drive to and from work everyday, it’s about 28 miles to and from work. So the amount of time it takes to leave my house to the time I get to my desk, and vice versa, can vary anywhere from 45 minutes to 1.5 hours. So again, this means I’m on the road anywhere from 1.5 to 3 hours a day. What a waste of time!

Since I get a free bus pass at work, this not only saves money but time. From the time I walk out my door to the time I get to my desk riding the bus is usually about 25-40 minutes each way. So I could spend anywhere from 50 minutes to 1.4 hours a day riding the bus. This is more than a 50% savings on my time that I spend in transit everyday. And while I’m on the bus, I theoretically could do other work or something else productive. But I’ll get to that in a second.

So now that you understand the time savings, let’s get back into the money issue. Let’s figure out what I’m paying (although I won’t use real numbers because I do not want to disclose my actual financial situation to everyone in the world).

Let’s say that I pay the average cost for a shared room situation in LA at about $700. This is the location that takes me generally the longest to get to and from work. Then, to save on gas, car maintenance costs and time, I go find another place to stay closer on the weeknights that costs me about the same at $600. So the total that I have to pay for living is $1,300 per month. Is that extra $600 a month going to offset the amount that I pay for gas and car maintenance every month? Definitely not. Here’s what it looks like.

280 miles a week to and from work
100+ miles travel to and from 2nd job plus social life (could easily vary)
380 miles
/24 miles – the average amount of miles I get per gallon
16 = amount of gallons I fill up per week
* $2.85 per gallon
$45.60 a week!
* 4
$182.4 a month

Wow, that’s just the amount I pay for gas every month. Then there’s car maintenance. However, instead of figuring out the cost of maintenance, let’s just use the other figure.

$.50-.60 per mile
* 380 miles a week
$190 – 228
* 4 weeks in a month
$912

So as you can see, this is really adding up! Now let’s assume that this is all of my car costs. Now we need to factor in the time that I could use spending on other projects. Since I basically decreased the daily amount of time that I spend on the road, I gain about 7.5 hours – 1 hour (drive to and from the 2nd house) = 6 hours every week.

During the 6 hours, I could make anywhere from $25 – 50 an hour from my freelance work or client work. This is about $150 – 300 additional dollars I could make with this freetime!

Now let’s look at the other situation. Here’s what I spend in gas alone:

50 miles a week to and from house
100 miles to and from 2nd job plus social life
150 miles a week
/ 24 miles per gallon
6.25 gallons a week
* 4 weeks in a month
25 gallons a month
* $2.85 per gallon
$71.25 a month

Now for overall maintenance

$.50-$.60 per mile
150 miles per week
$75 – 90
* 4 a month
$360

So here’s the final monthly breakdown as I see it.

Scenario #1:

$700 – rent at house #1
$912 – car maintenance costs
$150 – potential money I lose by wasting the time on the road
$1762 a month!

Scenario #2:

$700 – House #1
$600 – House #2
$360 – car maintenance costs
$1660 a month

Not much of a savings, but then again I still have that other potential $150 I could add

$1660 expenses
-$150 additional income to offset costs
$1510

Oh, and another expense that won’t exist anymore is garage fee!

$1510
-$90 a month for garage fee
$1420

. . . wow. So, this means that per month, all I’m really saving is about $342. Or to put it in another perspective, that’s $4104 a year. That’s a huge chunk of change, people.

The Destruction of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

Extensive information on Hurricane Katrina.

I’m sure that anyone who reads this probably won’t get this until Monday morning or afternoon, but if you do get this in time, this is really fascinating.

CBS station WWL based in New Orleans is streamcasting a live news feed to track the hurricane destruction and news (and coverage has been continual for days). It’s very interesting watching the live broadcast as this hurricane makes landfall. In fact, since the hurricane is so strong and powerful, they closed the French Quarter site in New Orleans and are now broadcasting from Baton Rouge at LSU. I also see that sister station KHOU in Houston is helping with the streamcast.

It’s amazing how far along technology has come along, but I also realize that there’s still so much more to come. For instance, cell phone communications in the New Orleans area are extremely difficult to get good reception. Text messaging supposedly worked a lot better. If the hurricane blows down these towers, no more reception. And it could also affect the landlines as well. That’s pretty scary.

It seems that this storm is going to completely ravage the southeast side of Louisana. Can’t wait to see what happens tomorrow morning.

Edit 8/30/05: The news coverage for this hurricane devistation has been amazing. Not only are there are a lot of new media personnel in New Orleans, but there are bloggers covering it, NASA has released photos of the view from satellites, and there are so many other ways to get news! In fact, I’m watching WWL as I type this from the Internet!

In case you haven’t followed what’s happened, the levees have broken in New Orleans and the French Quarter and most of downtown is completely drenched up to about 3 feet or more of water. Supposedly, once the water receeds, they will only allow people back into the city to collect belongings but then have to leave for a month! I cannot even IMAGINE what they would be like if that happens to be true, which I now find out it is true.

High resolution photos of Katrina from space

They have declared Martial Law in the city as well. Martial Law is usually declared in areas that have no rule at all, such as war zones. The reason they declared this is because there’s so much looting going on that it’s almost like living in a war zone. Most of this looting occured last night and will probably be the same tonight when people are less likely to get caught.

One of the most dangerous aspects of being stuck with all of this water is the disease, snakes, gators, urine, vomit, and sewage that is mixed. This makes it not only unsafe but potentially deadly. And water levels continue to rise while the Corp of Engineers tries to plug the broken levees.

Does the city of New Orleans actually recover from something like this? Or should the people of this city just call it as it is and find another place to live?

2pm – Not too long ago, a mandatory evacuation of New Orleans was proclaimed. This means anyone who is still in New Orleans, which at this point is hundreds or thousands of people, will be forced from their homes and dwellings and forced to go elsewhere. I wonder how many people are going to try to stay behind?

8/31 8:30am – Since yesterday, flood waters never receeded and in fact kept rising. There are still possibly hundreds or thousands of people who need to be rescued. And now, they plan to transfer around 23,000 people from the Superdome to the Houston Astrodome. I have no idea how this is going to happen since almost all roads to New Orleans are closed!

It’s so weird how close to “home” this has happened. The fact that I went there a little over two months ago makes this even more real to me. Most of downtown New Orleans is fresh in my mind. I am here thousands of miles away and I still can feel everything as though it happened here.

I have donated to UMCOR (United Methodist Committee on Relief) today and I urge anyone who reads this to do the same with UMCOR or the Red Cross. I believe this is the least I could do in the name of humanity.
I URGE you to do the SAME!

WWL has kept a blog about ongoing news throughout the last 24 hours or so.

Another really awesome use of technology has been the forums on both WWL and Craigslist. So many people have posted on both of these sites asking for help to find loved ones and missing people.

9/1 9:30pm – I’m starting to get Google hits because people want to know more about New Orleans hurricane information.

Hurricane Katrina photos from USA Today
Photos from downtown New Orleans
Flickr photos of Hurricane Katrina

Houston has a huge task on their hand with the thousands of homeless who are staying in Houston. I hope they can handle it.